16:45 CET
ESR US SC/EFSUMB - Ultrasound simulation models in training and education: where are we going?
Education
Wednesday, February 27, 08:30 - 10:00
Room: Y
Type of session: Joint Session of the ESR Ultrasound Subcommittee with EFSUMB
Topic: Education
Moderators: D. A. Clevert (Munich/DE), P. S. Sidhu (London/GB)

A-0039
08:30
Chairpersons' introduction (part 1)
D. A. Clevert; Munich/DE
Learning Objectives

1. To learn about which technical procedures are proposed in a simulation-based curriculum in radiology.
2. To learn about advantages and disadvantages of the different types of ultrasound simulators available.
3. To learn about the possibility of using virtual reality and gamification for training.
4. To learn about the experience from different parts of Europe in using ultrasound simulation training.

Abstract

This session deals with the ever advancing practice of using simulators for education and training of ultrasound practitioners. Many new developments of technology related to the machines and simulators make this an attractive proposal. Experts in the field will detail experience and discuss the future directions. New simulators will be presented, and data will be discussed.

A-0040
08:35
Chairpersons' introduction (part 2)
P. S. Sidhu; London/GB
Learning Objectives

1. To learn about which technical procedures are proposed in a simulation-based curriculum in radiology.
2. To learn about advantages and disadvantages of the different types of ultrasound simulators available.
3. To learn about the possibility of using virtual reality and gamification for training.
4. To learn about the experience from different parts of Europe in using ultrasound simulation training.

Abstract

This session deals with the ever advancing practice of using simulators for education and training of ultrasound practitioners. Many new developments of technology related to the machines and simulators make this an attractive proposal. Experts in the field will detail experience and discuss the future directions. New simulators will be presented, and data will be discussed.

A-0041
08:40
Needs assessment of simulations-based training in radiology
L. Nayahangan; Copenhagen/DK
Learning Objectives

1. To learn about how to perform a needs assessment using the Delphi method.
2. To learn about how a needs assessment identified and prioritised technical procedures to be included in a simulation-based curriculum.
3. To learn about how the list of procedures may be used as guide for development of training programmes.

Abstract

Radiology is rapidly evolving with the advent of sophisticated, state-of-the-art imaging modalities. The implementation of these advanced technologies requires the need for alternative training methods such as simulation to supplement the traditional apprenticeship approach. Simulation-based education has been adapted in radiology to provide trainees with the opportunities to practice different technical and diagnostic skills, including interpretative and non-interpretative skills. Many simulation-based training programs exist; however, they are most often developed based on the availability of simulation equipment, local interests or other practical considerations. The development of training programs should follow a systematic approach by starting with a general needs assessment to ensure that these are aligned with current trainee needs. The needs assessment follows a structured three-round Delphi method to identify technical procedures that are suitable for simulation-based training. This iterative approach involves a panel of key opinion leaders to gather information and achieve consensus regarding procedures for simulation training. Round 1 is a brainstorming phase to gather procedures that a newly qualified radiologist should be able to perform. Round 2 is rating the procedures using a needs assessment formula to explore frequency, the number of doctors, impact on patients and feasibility for simulation-based training. Round 3 involves the elimination and final prioritisation of the procedures. The needs assessment process using the Delphi method identifies and prioritises a list of technical procedures for simulation-based training. This list provides an important foundation for the planning and development of simulation-based training programs in Radiology.

A-0042
09:00
Review of the available market of ultrasound simulators
M. Bachmann Nielsen; Copenhagen/DK
Learning Objectives

1. To learn about different types of simulators on the market.
2. To learn about which are suitable for beginners or advanced levels, and which can be used for training in interventional ultrasound.
3. To learn about advantages and disadvantages of different types of ultrasound simulators.

Abstract

A number of simulators are available for training abdominal ultrasound examinations. A screen with limited number of knobs aims to resemble a clinical ultrasound machine. Most simulators will use a dummy torso and a look-a-like transducer and others will use a joystick or a mouse. To train the coordination of the probe positioning and the screen a simple cartoonish sonogram may suffice. The presentation will aim to present a number of simulators available as per February 2019 including simple simulators, high-end simulators comprised of 3D patient examinations, virtual reality simulators and simulators aimed for biopsy training. Each simulator will have its strengths and weaknesses. It is not clear which simulator to use for specific needs.

A-0043
09:20
Gamification and virtual reality in medical simulation
L. Konge; Copenhagen/DK
Learning Objectives

1. To learn about gamification as a tool in medical education.
2. To learn about virtual reality in medical education.
3. To learn which possible ways virtual reality and gamification could be implemented in ultrasound.

Abstract

The old “see-one, do-one, teach-one” approach to medical education is outdated. Simulation-based training provides evidence for better efficacy, less stress, better patient outcomes, and improved return-on-investment. The question is no longer if we should use simulators to train our future doctors but how. There is a huge implementation gap regarding simulation in medical education. Despite the solid evidence, simulation is still severely under-utilised as a teaching modality, and initial training on patients are still very common. Virtual reality simulators and gamification allow new trainees to measure their own progress and compete against peers - this is highly motivating and could be a driver for implementation.

09:40
Panel discussion: Will there be an option to include these technics in our daily work and how could we improve the outcome?
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