04:09 CET
EM 5 - Radiographers' challenges offering imaging services in Africa
General Radiography (Radiographers) Education Management/Leadership Professional Issues EuroSafe Imaging
Friday, March 1, 16:00 - 17:30
Type of session: ISRRT meets Africa
Topic: General Radiography (Radiographers), Education, Management/Leadership, Professional Issues, EuroSafe Imaging
Moderators: D. Newman (Fargo/US), P. Gerson (Paris/FR)

16:00
Chairpersons' introduction (part 1)
D. Newman; Fargo/US
Learning Objectives

1. To recognise the demographics and patient accessibility to health services of a particular African country.
2. To understand the infrastructure of the imaging health services and their contribution to the primary and hospital health services to sustain the population and individual health.
3. To appreciate the radiographers' effort to keep up to date with evidence-based practice in imaging services.
4. To become familiar with the radiology education system and lifelong learning opportunities for radiographers practicing in Africa.

16:04
Chairpersons' introduction (part 2)
P. Gerson; Paris/FR
Learning Objectives

1. To recognise the demographics and patient accessibility to health services of a particular African country.
2. To understand the infrastructure of the imaging health services and their contribution to the primary and hospital health services to sustain the population and individual health.
3. To appreciate the radiographers' effort to keep up to date with evidence-based practice in imaging services.
4. To become familiar with the radiology education system and lifelong learning opportunities for radiographers practicing in Africa.

Abstract

This paper is about ISRRT involvement in Africa for the past 24 years in more than 10countries. Beginning in 1994 in Tanzania. ISRRT has organised several workshops and congresses in this continent especially in French-speaking African countries. The involvement has contributed to help countries to set up associations and establish a huge network in Africa.

16:08
Nigeria. Healthcare services in Nigeria: the radiographers' opportunities and challenges
E. Olasunkanmi Balogun; Lagos/NG
Learning Objectives

1. To recognise the demographics and patient accessibility to healthcare services in a densely populated country as Nigeria.
2. To understand the infrastructure of the imaging health services and their contribution to the primary and hospital health services to sustain the population and individual health.
3. To appreciate the radiographers' effort to keep up to date with evidence-based practice in imaging services.
4. To become familiar with the radiography education system and lifelong learning opportunities for radiographers practicing in Nigeria and its environs.
5. To look at the challenges of team work/professional rivalry/nomenclature even in the face of infrastructural challenges.

Abstract

Radiography is an art and science of the application of both ionising and non-ionising radiation in diagnostics and treatment of diseases when medically indicated. The study of radiography dates back in Nigeria, first as hospital-based training after which foreign examinations were taken. These examinations were conducted by the college of radiographers, London, United Kingdom. The certificates evolved from MSR, DSR, to DCR In the year 1965 the first indigenous school was established in Lagos (Circa) and then another in Ibadan in the year 1972. The bachelors of Science (BSc) in Radiography started in the year 1983 and has spread over the years with seven universities offering radiography at a first-degree level and three at postgraduate levels. Training of manpower is the bedrock of better practice, therefore, the increase in training schools brought about an increase in manpower and translated to better practice across the country. The status of being a developing Nation as well as a Small non-influential market brought great challenges to the availability and maintenance of infrastructure. Recently the Nigerian government introduced the public, private, partnership (PPP) model of funding which has helped with increasing access to very expensive but needed equipment. There are a few challenges with the Scope of practice, hands-on training and limitations by government policies. Radiography training and practice in Nigeria is progressing and still an arrowhead even in Africa as a continent. However, Research funding opportunities are required.

16:26
South Africa. The South African radiographer: button pusher or creative thinker?
H. Friedrich-Nel; Bloemfontein/ZA
Learning Objectives

1. To learn about the radiography education models in South Africa.
2. To become familiar with continuing education requirements and registration.
3. To share the revised scope of practice.

Abstract

In 2014 two of the Universities of Technology in South Africa implemented four-year degrees in radiography. The Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA) and specifically the Professional board for Radiography and Clinical Technology (RCT) guided this process. Previously the education and training model was a two-year hospital-based diploma and a three-year bachelor’s degree or diploma. Six years after the first universities implemented the revised education and training model, the question lingers: Do universities deliver radiography graduates with the ability to work independently, think critically and creatively? Recently the HPCSA updated the scope of practice of a radiographer to align this with the four-year bachelor’s degree education and training model to offer expanded opportunities to the radiographer who wishes to engage in lifelong learning opportunities. In South Africa, it is a statutory requirement for a health care practitioner to register with the HPCSA. To maintain his or her HPCSA registration each registered healthcare practitioner (radiographer) must pay a yearly registration fee and earn 30 continuing education units (CEUs). Five CEUs must be collected in the category ethics, patient-centred care and patient rights.

16:44
Côte d'Ivoire. Professional practice of radiology and imaging in Africa: radiographers for more commitment and responsibility in patients’ safety
K. B. Yao; Abidjan/CI
Learning Objectives

1. To reveal the challenges faced by African radiographers in practicing their profession.
2. To learn about the different actions carried out by radiographers for radiographers within Africa, in seeking alternatively affordable means of practicing their profession.
3. To appreciate the ISRRT's initiatives and capacity building projects to provide sustainable support to radiographers in Africa.
4. To understand the clues set up by ISRRT regional officers' to improve patient care.

Abstract

Radiology is the pathway to clinical settings and Diagnostic imaging. It is a powerful tool
in medicine and its influence is expected to increase for years to come. Besides, the growth of modern imaging depends on advances in
technologies and the professional practice includes the developpement of
radiographers’ skills as well as the implementation of radiation safety culture.
However, in Africa, hundreds of hospitals and institutions do not have the
possibilities to perform the most fundamental imaging procedures, for lack of appropriate
technologies, and skills. Moreover, setting a careful balance between the benefits and the risks related to
patients’ exposure is a challenge. Despite the recurrent
shortage, african Technologists keep on struggling to bridge the gap.
The methodology of
approch consists in covering the state of art of professional practice and
safety, revealing the main gaps and actions carried out to bridge them up and,
the perspective and operational plan for better view on the future.
As delivrable oucomes, different projects carried out by radiographers and
results are presented and their impact on professional practice and safety
discussed.They are essentially made up by developpement of home made equipment for
professional practice purpose, training project to strenghten radiograohers’
skills.
The global situation
of practice is caracterised by a gap between international standards and local settings. Therefore, radiographers
are urged to demonstrate more commitment and responsibility in the management
of their activities. Besides, ISRRT’s support is very much appreciated and exchange
between technologists, through international congress is strongly encouraged.

17:02
Kenya. Discovering Kenyan radiographers: past, present and future
C. Muchuki; Nairobi/KE
Learning Objectives

1. To understand the current situation and trend of radiographers in Kenya.
2. To understand the Kenyan health system.
3. To become familiar with Kenyan radiation safety issues; Afro safe Kenyan chapter.

Abstract

Kenya is a country in East Africa with a coastline on the Indian Ocean with a population of 49 Million. It’s a home to wildlife and Maasai Mara Reserve known for its annual wildebeest migrations. The Kenyan radiographers are governed by Society of Radiography in Kenya (SORK) a registered professional body whose overall aim is to promote, support, regulate the professional standards of practice, conduct, and ethics of radiographers. Currently, they are 1200 registered radiographers and 300 radiologists in the country. Kenya medical training college offers Diploma in imaging courses for three years. Additional training is Bachelor of Radiography program an integrated academic and clinical course of 4 years duration. The Kenyan radiological system is continuously innovating. Previously, radiographers would process the films in a darkroom, now we have jumped into a new era. The workflow is greatly facilitated by automatic machine-facilitated workflow processes, and Patients receive digital imaging. Kenya’s health care system is structured in a step-wise manner so that complicated cases are referred to a higher level. Gaps in the system are filled by private and church-run units. There are three major national hospitals in Kenya, where Kenyatta National Hospital is the largest Referral Hospital in Kenya and the entire East and Central Africa. It caters for 80,000 in-patients, >500,000 out-patients annually with a bed capacity of 1800. It offers diagnostic imaging service to >300 patients daily. Concerning radiation safety, AFROSAFE campaign addresses issues arising from radiation protection in medicine in Africa.

17:20
Panel discussion
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